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via Inc.com by Jessica Stillman Back when there were approximately 57 people running to be the Democratic nominee for president, entrepreneur turned candidate Andrew Yang distinguished himself from the crowded field by pushing the idea of universal basic income. Free money from the government has obvious political upsides,...

via Inc.com by Bill Murphy Think about the people you know who always seem to get what they want. Are they self-centered? Are they their own best advocates? When you think of their success, do you feel happy for them? Do you admire them? If you don't, let's assume for our purposes...

via The Greater Good by Elizabeth Hopper Feeling grateful can bring us a variety of benefits, including better mental and physical health and improved relationships. We tend to think of gratitude as an emotion we experience when things are going well, one that is closely associated with...

via Medium by Benjamin Hardy specially in a time of social unrest, widespread unemployment, and a global pandemic, the advice to “stay hopeful!” might make you groan. But in getting through hard times, hope may be more powerful than we realize. In his book Making Hope Happen, the...

via Psychology Today by Christopher Bergland A psychological intervention called "ENHANCE"—which is a comprehensive 12-week program designed to boost subjective well-being (SWB) and promote sustainable happiness—may have a positive effect on self-reported physical health, according to a new study. This paper (Kushlev et al., 2020) was published on...

via Forbes by Jill Douka Is it possible to control your emotions and reform your thoughts so that they don't affect your psychology and positive energy? Changing our mood is sometimes thought to be an unpredictable factor, a mysterious internal mechanism we don't have any power...

via the Ladders by Kyle Schnitzer Good vibes can bring good health, too. A new study conducted by researchers from Georgetown University found that psychological intervention designed to boost “subjective well-being” can bring positive effects on self-reported mental health. The study, published in the SAGE Journal of Psychological Science, was done with researchers...

via Mashable by Chris Taylor The first self-described self-help book was published in 1859. The author's name, improbably, was Samuel Smiles; the title, even more improbably, was Self-Help. A distillation of lessons from the lives of famous people who had pulled themselves up by their bootstraps, it...

via FastCompany by Sarah Goff-Dupont If you want to learn a thing or two about emotional resilience, just talk to entrepreneur Ash Ambirge, creator of the Middle Finger Project. She’s been looked down on because she grew up in a trailer park. She’s been fired from jobs...